Hexagonal Beam Antenna Presentation by Rob Conklin N4WGY

At our last meeting earlier this month, we were treated to an excellent talk about Hexagonal Beam antennas, or Hex Beams,  by Rob Conklin N4WGY. Rob is a local ham, a mechanical engineer, and a home brewer.  He introduced to us what the Hex Beams are, how they perform, and how they are constructed. And he shared his home brewing experience of building one for himself. He showed us how relatively easy they are to build.  It was such a good talk, and a good source of information, that I would like to highlight what he shared.

These are some attractive characteristics of the Hex Beam.

  1. They are relatively low-cost directional antennas compared to the regular multiband Yagis, and don’t require large towers.
  2. Compared to the regular Yagis, their profile provides lower wind loading, and they are relatively more stealthy.
  3. They are relatively light weight (~25 lbs) and small (~22 feet diameter).
  4. They perform well. Their gain and front/back ratio are comparable to the regular 2-element Yagis. They will work well if just above the roof. They are typically HF, and for HF many of the measurements don’t require tight tolerances. They have about a 3 dbi gain over dipoles.
  5. You can buy commercially made Hex Beams.
  6. But they also are very conductive to home brewing.  Good selections of commercial parts and kits are available.  You don’t need fancy tools nor a lot of skill.
  7. You can get up to 6 bands without traps and without a tuner.  They are relatively easy to adjust.

Hex Beam Design

When I first saw Hex Beam antennas, I was confused because I couldn’t immediately distinguish what their many elements were for. But actually their basic plan is simple.

If it is a monoband antenna, it is just a 2-element wire Yagi system, with a driver and reflector. The wires are supported by what looks like an upside-down umbrella structure.  The structure consists of 6 spreader arms mounted radially from a central base-plate, and a straight center post also mounted from the base-plate. The wires mostly follow the spreader arms’ hexagonal shape.  The driven element wires are supported by one half of the upside-down umbrella, the reflector is supported by the other half.  The spreader arms are structurally supported at their open ends by Dacron tension cords connected to the top of the central post.  Two Dacron cords also run between two spreader arms on the front driver side of the antenna, to maintain correct separation.  The central post contains a 50 ohm coax feed.  A mast mounted to the bottom of the base-plate can be rotated to direct the antenna.

Hex Beams are often multi-band antennas, with up to 6 bands. The multi-band antennas have individual 2-element wire Yagi systems for each band, stacked as you go higher up the umbrella. The 6-band Hex Beam that Rob built operates 6, 10, 12, 15, 17, and 20 meters. The shorter wavelength 6 meters antenna wires are the lowest, where the distance between spreader arms is least.  20 meters wires are the highest.

And so unlike the regular Yagis which use trap coils to operate on multiple bands, the Hex Beam design just utilizes separate wire sets for each band.

This is Rob’s antenna on the roof at his home.

Hex beam antenna on Rob's roof.

Hex beam antenna on Rob’s roof. The front driven element side is facing us.  Click to enlarge, click “back” on your browser to return.  [Courtesy N4WGY]

Classic and G3TXQ Hex Beam Versions

Rob discussed two designs of the Hex Beam. The original classic version was manufactured by Traffie Technologies, and then copied by many home brewers. Rob said many hams use it and swear by it. But it has two performance shortcomings.  First, it is narrow banded; that is, if you tuned the antenna length for the SSB portion of the band, its SWR might be too high at the CW end. Second, if front/back selectivity is peaked, the SWR is no longer optimized. And so that front/back selectivity had to be compromised.

The shortcomings were overcome in 2007 by Steve Hunt G3TXQ. After extensive modeling and experimenting, he developed a modified design that corrected both problems and gave the hex beam better performance: The G3TXQ design has good SWR across the full ham bands.  And the peak front/back ratio is at the optimal SWR.  With a slightly simpler wire system, it is also is a little easier to build. Rob built a K4KIO version of the G3GTX design.

In both the original and G3TXQ designs, the layout of the driven element wires is similar.  The driven element layout is shaped like an “M”, or more precisely like two “V”s.  One end of each “V” starts from the feed connection at the central post, extends to a spreader arm, then continues as a side of the hexagon to the next spreader arm.  Spacer ropes clamped at the spreader arms keep the wires in sufficient tension.

Schematic top view of G3TXQ Hexbeam antenna

Schematic top view of G3TXQ Hexbeam antenna. [Courtesy N4WGY]

The other end of the spacer ropes connect to the reflector wires. The spacer ropes keep a critical separation distance between the driver and reflector elements. The lengths of the wire elements and the spacer ropes are the critical measurements to make for the hex beam.

In the original design, the reflector wires had also followed an “M” shape configuration. In the G3TXQ design, however, the reflector wires follow the hexagonal shape provided by the spreader arms.

Performance

As Rob points out, the G3TXQ design provides good SWR performance across the full range of each ham band. He showed us a spectrum analysis of his antenna.

Full SWR scan of N4WGY's hexbeam antenna, from 1 to 36 MHz (160 to 10 meters ham bands). [Courtesy N4WGY]

Full SWR scan of N4WGY’s hex beam antenna, from 1 to 36 MHz (160 to 10 meters ham bands). The grey columns are the ham bands.  Note the SWR dips where this hex beam is designed for: 20, 17, 15, 12, and 10 meters. The antenna is also resonant for 6 meters (50 MHz), but the analyzer doesn’t reach that high a frequency.   [Courtesy N4WGY]

 The chart shows the SWR performance of his Hex Beam, as the frequency varies from 1 MHz at left to 36 MHz at right.  The shaded columns are the locations of the amateur radio bands.  For the bands not designed for, 160, 80, 40, and 30 meters at left, the SWR values are well above 3:1.  At 20 meters the SWR dips to about 1.2:1 and is well below 2:1 across that band. The SWR for the other ham bands designed for also remain below 2:1 and in some cases also dip to as low as 1.2:1.   You can click the image to see the details for each band. You can see Rob made his lengths slightly long, but he can adjust that, to better position the dips within the ham bands.

Rob brought in to show us the antenna analyzer he used to scan his antenna and make the chart.  This analyzer connects through a USB cable to a computer, where the scans can be displayed, zoomed in for details, and saved.  The analyzer is made in India as a kit and costs under $60.  The analyzer is called a Fox Delta AAZ-0914Ahttp://www.foxdelta.com/products/aaz-0914a.htm.

Rob mentioned that he can reliably make contacts around the world, when propagation permits.  And he feels comfortable competing with hams with larger antenna systems.

Construction Tips

Rob Conklin N4WGY presenting at our meeting [Photo courtesy NM4T]

Rob Conklin N4WGY presenting at our meeting, here discussing construction details. [Photo courtesy NM4T]

Rob devoted much of his talk to construction details, and much of the Q&A from the group was about components and building. I will mostly defer to the online resources Rob suggested. But Rob did give some additional advice:

  • Don’t use PVC for the center post.  Especially in the South with UV from sunlight, the material will quickly degrade.  Spend the extra money to get UV resistant tubes.  He recommends buying online the mast sold by K4KIO.
  • For the wire sets, he says 14 AWG stranded/plated and uninsulated antenna wire would be best.
  • Telescoping fiberglass poles are recommended for the spreader arms.
  • Do not make the wire elements too tight.

Here are resource links.

Construction plans:

  • http://www.hex-beam.com/ – The K4KIO website with detailed, step-by-step construction plans, similar to what Rob showed us.

Supplies and commercial hex beam kits:

SWR scanner tool:

Addendum

For the close of the talk, Craig Behrens NM4T brought in to show us a light-weight, self-contained, portable G3TXQ hex beam antenna. It is designed and manufactured by a company in Germany called Folding Antennas.  The antenna weighs only 9 pounds, is collapsable to 45 inches, and comes in an easy-to-carry bag. Instead of folding out like an upside-down umbrella, the spreader arms fold out flat.  The flat configuration has much less bending load, and therefore the spreaders are made thinner and lighter.  The wires have special fittings to attach to the poles. The antenna can be assembled by one person in 10 minutes. [See http://www.vibroplex.com/contents/en-us/d3.html. ]

Craig also showed us a prototype TenTech Patriot QRP transceiver.  It operates SSB, CW, and digital modes on 20 and 40 meters at 10 Watts.  Its design was influenced from recommendations by his QRP Skunkwerks group.  During the following week Rob Suggs KB5EZ (one of the members of that group) gave it some field testing.

 

The club again thanks Rob Conklin N4WGY for giving us an excellent practical, educational presentation.  The club also thanks Craig Behrens NM4T.  And thanks to our members and guests for participating.

One of the eQSLs the club recently received shows a hex beam of KL2R, the Two Rivers Contest Club in Fairbanks, Alaska. You can see the wires in front of the aurora.

QSL card we received from KL2R in Fairbanks, Alaska, showing their hex beam at night (with aurora).

QSL card we received from KL2R in Fairbanks, Alaska, showing their hex beam at night (with aurora).

6 meters opening to South America

5 element 6 meters yagi directional antenna at WA4NZD

5 element 6 meters yagi beam antenna at WA4NZD

At the end of the work day last Friday, I noticed DXmaps showed 6 meters QSOs from the southeast U.S. to Latin America.  And so as soon as I finished work, I went to the club station to see for myself.

I heard some 6 meters signals but they were weak.  I therefore decided to assess conditions.  My first check was to listen for beacons below 50.08 MHz, but I heard none.  I then tried scanning the beam 360 degrees while on the CW calling frequency and on a couple of CW frequencies higher, but heard nothing.  However I had heard some SSB phone higher up and went back there.  At first I just noticed relatively local phone stations, but I didn’t hear their contacts.  I then tuned to the phone calling frequency, and then a little lower.

And there was the first DX!  CE3SX in Santiago, Chile, at FF46, on phone SSB.  6 meters was indeed alive, at least to the south.

But the band conditions were tenuous.  The signal was ghost-like, as if not fully there, and difficult to copy.  Eventually I copied the call sign and QTH.  Then I called, and right away had a successful QSO.  I don’t know how easily he copied me, but he got my information right away.

I then went back to a stronger phone signal, and worked WA3VXJ, Karl. He was talking from near Pittsbugh, PA, but he was operating remotley through Skype from Englewood, FL, EL86.

Given that the signals were weak, but there, I then tried working CW and JT65.  I made two JT65 contacts without much trouble, with LU8EX in Argentina GF05, and with CX5BL in Uruguay GF15.  I saw on the display, more faintly, signals from two N3 stations in the FM grids, but they disappeared before I could get to them.  Meanwhile both of those South American stations stayed on JT65 for awhile, but I didn’t hear anyone they contacted.

I then moved down to the CW section, below 50.11 MHz.  I heard two strong stations in south Florida, and worked them: AE2DX in EL88 and  WC4H in EL95.  I heard them work other stations both south and north.  When I tried scanning the beam north though, I couldn’t find any signals.  I even tried calling CQ.  I therefore decided to keep pointing south, and work what I could in that direction, while there was an opening.

Again, all the South American stations I heard were weak and ghostlike, as if coming through shimmering waves that distorted them.  But they didn’t fade away.  I took the approach to listen carefully to the ongoing QSOs, to glean all their information first.  Determining the callsigns was difficult, as a “dit” or “dah” could fade out.  But they kept calling CQ, and often enough they kept working other stations.  I had to listen many times before I felt reasonably sure of the callsigns.   I then tried contacting.  I succeeded in contacting: PY2RN in Brazil GG66 Sao Paulo,  PY2XB also in Brazil GG66, ZP6CW in Paraguay GG14, ZP5SNA also in Paraguay GG14 and close in frequency too, and LU5FF in Argentina FF99.

By then I was getting tired.  But I got in one more phone QSO with a strong station in Florida, Rudy WD4AB in Miami EL95.

Later during the weekend I looked up the stations I contacted on QRZ.  Many of them had substantial antenna systems for VHF and above.  Perhaps that accounts for how the South American operators could copy me quickly.  It is as if I walked into another special part of the ham radio forest, with specialized foresters and hunters.

As one who had been away from ham radio for awhile and who is not familiar with VHF, I value having our club station available with its capabilities.  I have the chance to try more bands and modes than I’ve done before, in new situations, including ones like this, with a 6 meters opening. Our experienced members have been developing our station equipment.  That’s good for them.  And it is also good for our new and less experienced hams.  We have a good asset to help us develop our experiences.

Below are e-QSLs we received from the 6 meters opening. Most also confirmed on LoTW right away.

AE2DX EL88 FL, CW QSO

AE2DX EL88 FL, CW QSO

LU8EX GF05 Argentina, JT65 contact

LU8EX GF05 Argentina, JT65 contact

CX5BL GF15 Uruguay, JT65 contact

CX5BL GF15 Uruguay, JT65 contact

PY2RN GG66 Brazil, CW contact

PY2RN GG66 Brazil, CW contact

ZP6CW 20141004 WA4NZD 6m CW GG14 Paraguay

ZP6CW GG14 Paraguay, CW contact

LU5FF FF99 Argentina, CW contact

LU5FF FF99 Argentina, CW contact

73, Gary WA2JQZ

Hex Beam Antenna presentation at our next meeting Oct. 2, 2014

We are delighted to have Rob Conklin, N4WGY, come to talk with us at our next club meeting.  He will share a short slide presentation about his experience in home brewing, mounting and using a K4KIO designed 6 band Hexagonal beam type antenna. After the presentation we’ll have time for Q&A.

Also on our agenda will be the upcoming W1AW/4 week-long operation from Alabama, 15-22 Oct. 2014.

If you have access to the Arsenal, please come join us.

Thursday October 2, 2014, meeting start 4:30 pm
Bldg. 4622, MSFC, Redstone Arsenal, AL
[location on Google maps]

- Gary, WA2JQZ

Museum Ship Weekend (June 7 & 8, 2014)

During the Alabama QSO Party ops on Saturday June 7th, Stephen KK4IBB and I WA2JQZ also contacted several historical ships.  We were aware that weekend was Museum Ships Weekend.  And although the museum ships weren’t our first priority, they caught our interest.

The Museum Ships Weekend is an annual event.  This year 104 museum ships and maritime museums participated.  They all seem to have ham radio clubs dedicated to those ships and museums, or they seem to have local clubs who support them and operate their special events.

During our Saturday June 7th ops, Stephen KK4IBB found and contacted 6 of those ships (while I logged).  Their station operators told us something about the ships and histories.  We learned at least some were operating from their radio rooms.  As I tried to visualize that, I realized also we were contacting different kinds of ships, with a diversity of histories. Now they were settled as museums in many places around the country and around the world.  Visualizing all that made the experience richer.

I decided to return to the club station on Sunday afternoon, to see if I could contact some more.  These are the ships we contacted that weekend, in the order we found them:

We also contacted these museums, each on CW:

  • Watson Museum (K1USN), the site of the Fore River Ship and Engine Company, which built ships during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, now the Watson Library & Research Center in Braintree, MA.
  • National Museum of the Pacific War (N5P), a dedicated museum to the Pacific and Asiatic theaters of World War II, in Fredericksburg, TX. Begun by Admiral Chester Nimitz.

We heard other ships too, but didn’t succeed in contacting them.  I heard the Swedish submarine Nordkaperen on CW, but the signal was faint, and I didn’t believe I could get through other stations working it.  We heard the USS Nautilus in Groton, CT, the first nuclear powered submarine.  They had long pileups, and they stopped operating before I could get in.  (I visited that ship museum years ago, and didn’t feel a loss.)  It therefore made sense to try the less popular ships, which nonetheless also gave us more diversity and a larger maritime story.

I noticed the CW operations tended to be more relaxed, perhaps because fewer hams tried contacting the museums that way.  When I contacted the Red Oak Victory and The National Museum of the Pacific War, their operators took time to tell me about their museums and to chat with me.  The Red Oak Victory operator said good-bye with some nice nautical sayings (“with a following wind…”).

Many of the voice contacts, though, were also thoughtful.  I didn’t feel I was on a Disney ride.  Instead I felt I was speaking with real people, who could tell me something they knew about.

If we try the Museum Ships Weekend next year, we should give it more time.  As we found this year, the bands were already crowded with many other activities.  Some of the large and famous ships attracted pileups.  But with 104 museum stations operating, there is enough to go around, and the less-well-known can be interesting, and they may have more time to talk with you.

73, Gary WA2JQZ

NR4DL 20140607 WA4NZD 20m USB Ships Museums FL

The eQSL we received from the USCGC Ingham ARC. To date this is the only eQSL we received from the Museum Ships Weekend ops.

We earned a First Place award again!

The results for the 2014 ARRL International DX Phone Contest were just published. WA4NZD scored First Place within the Alabama Section, in the Multi-operator Single Transmitter Low Power category!

The contest was during the first weekend in March 2014.  We operated Friday night, Saturday and Sunday.

Our point score was 43,605, with 168 QSOs and 95 multipliers.  Within the global community we placed #2015 out of 4102 entries.

It is still too soon for us to receive a certificate.  We only learned the news by carefully checking the just published online article, ARRL International DX Contest – Phone 2014 Results .  You will see us on page 20, the Regional Leaders by Category Page, under the Southeast Region column.  The results are grouped by categories; we are with the MSLP (Multi-operator Single Transmitter Low Power) group.  The others shown in that group are other state leaders in the Southeast Region for that category: N4XI (VA), AJ4DT (FL), WA4NZD (AL), and WA1F (GA).  We weren’t in competition with the “heavy hitters” of these contests, who typically run scores above a million.  We are in a niche of our own.

Our operators who accomplished this were Matt KA0S, Rob KB5EZ, Kalen KK4KLT, Don N4MSN, and Gary WA2JQZ.  Rob, Kalen, Gary, and Matt operated Friday evening.  This was Kalen’s first contest.  Don operated on Saturday*.  And Gary came back on Sunday.

For us this was a chance to operate and practice our skills, and have some fun in ways that don’t come every day.  Many other hams around the world participate.  It is fun to meet them, and in doing so to recognize that the world is really a diverse place.  With many hams on the bands from so many places, you can notice propagation conditions and how those change over time.

We operated on 10, 15, and 20 meters, and just briefly (for 4 QSOs) on 40 meters.  10 meters was fortunately wide open for parts of the late afternoons.

We significantly increased our DXCC credits with this contest.  Some of the stations that gave us first-time Logbook of the World (LOTW) confirmations for their countries were JL1SAM (Japan), TF3W (Iceland), J75Y (Dominica), LX7I (Luxemburg), YS1/NP3J (El Salvador), HC2AO (Ecuador), and TO5A (Martinique) — to name some which quickly stand out in the record.

As we are not in competition with the “heavy hitters”, our contest operations are relatively relaxed.  Such activities make good learning experiences, no matter how much or how little experience you have.  Because hams of different experience levels and interests operate, they each will make different decisions, based on their needs and how they perceive their situations. Everyone influences what happens.  And so you get a richly diverse environment.

We’re in a unique niche to get such an award.  Nonetheless it reflects genuine and good things about us.  Congratulations to all of us!

- Gary, WA2JQZ

 

ARRL DX SSB Contest 2014

Rob KB5EZ and Kalen KK4KLT warming into the contest as it started Friday evening. This was Kalen’s first contest.

ARRL DX SSB Contest 2014

Rob KB5EZ at the mike with Gary WA2JQZ logging.

ARRL DX SSB Contest 2014

Matt KA0S at the mike, working the contest into late Friday evening. Don N4MSN continued working the contest on Saturday. And Gary WA2JQZ returned on Sunday afternoon.

* PS note — That Saturday, March 1st, was the Birmingham Hamfest. Rob KB5EZ and Gary WA2JQZ drove there with Craig Behrens NM4T and Jim Spikes N4KH, and they had an extra adventure of their own. Craig gave two forums based on his Caribbean DXpeditions. Besides participating in the hamfest, on the way back they stopped at an I-65 rest stop south of Culman, and operated QRP CW and JT65 until dark. The ARRL DX contest was only for phone, and so, operating CW and digital, they didn’t participate in the contest from the field. Malcolm K4MLP also attended the Birmingham Hamfest.

2013 NASA Picnic & June VHF Contest

Posted by Gary WA2JQZ with Rob KB5EZ.

We are catching up with interesting stories that we didn’t have the chance to write earlier. This story is now also posted in our Activites menu.

[You can click on images to see them larger.]

DSCN3482

Marshall Amateur Radio Club tent set up in the NASA Family Picnic area. We had the portable mast with a rotatable VHF antenna. Rob’s G5RV Jr wire antenna was strung to the trees.

On a sunny Saturday June 8, 2013, the Marshall Amateur Radio Club took part in the annual NASA Family Picnic at MSFC. We set up under a tent, surrounded by child-friendly activities and other clubs.  But also the band stage was located not far away. We had access to power. And, a water cooler was conveniently located right next to us.

Don N4MSN set up a portable antenna mast close by, from which we deployed a VHF antenna. Rob KB5EZ set up a G5RV jr wire antenna in the trees for HF. We operated with the Yaesu FT-950 for HF and 6 meters, and the FT-897 for VHF/UHF.

DSCN3478

Portable mast with VHF antenna

The weather for the day was beautiful. Many people of all ages stopped by to visit us. Members of the club took turns talking with folks and operating the radios, and enjoying the day. The center director and his wife dropped by the tent at the beginning of the event. We made a lot of folks aware of the club as well as ham radio in general.

 

DSCN3477

Alan WB5RMG discussed ham radio by the Marshall Amateur Radio Club tent.

N4CNY

John N4CNY

We made a few HF contacts, mostly digital modes due to the QRM (loud sounds) from the band on the nearby stage. Yet that weekend also was the ARRL June VHF Contest, and we succeeded in making a few local phone contacts on 2 meters as well.

Matt KA0S and Rob KB5EZ

Matt KA0S (ex-KI4EUR) and Rob KB5EZ.

Several young boys and girls, with their families, spent time with us. Some were delighted to have us teach them Morse Code and help them practice. According to their interests and curiosity, we showed educational brochures, engaged them with some deeper understanding and fun, and talked about next steps they could try.

Ghee

Ghee WL7C with a young visitor. The ARRL pamphlet says, “Dreams begin here ….”

Ghee

Studying Morse Code sheet while Ghee WL7C took a radio break.

Matt KA0S (ex-KI4EUR) and Jenny M

Matt KA0S (ex-KI4EUR) and Jenny M. operating.

After the picnic concluded some members returned our equipment to the shack, and continued to operate for the ARRL VHF Contest into the evening. Some members returned to the shack on Sunday too, and again continued to operate for the VHF Contest.

During the picnic, propagation at 50 MHz and above was poor. But back at the shack, 6 meters sometimes opened to the U.S. southwest. And then we had 6 meters “magic”.

Below are some of the eQSLs we received from our VHF Contest contacts. Some QSLs are from north Alabama where we are located. And some come from the openings to Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona.

 

AK4QR 20130608 WA4NZD 6m SSB June VHF EM64 AL_50pc K4TD 20130608 WA4NZD 6m CW EM64 AL_50pc NM5S 20130608 WA4NZD 6m CW DM75 NM_50pc W0RIC 20130609 WA4NZD 6m SSB DM79 CO_50pc W4YZJ 20130609 WA4NZD 6m SSB June VHF EM64 AL_50pc WA4DXP 20130608 WA4NZD 6m SSB June VHF EM64 Huntsville AL_50pc W4ENN 20130608 WA4NZD 6m CW June VHF EM64 AL_50pc KJ4UGO 20130608 WA4NZD 2m SSB June VHF EM64 AL_50pc W0FRC 20130609 WA4NZD 6m SSB June VHF DM78 CO_50pc NQ7R 20130608 WA4NZD 6m SSB June VHF DM42 AZ_50pc

 

And that’s how the story almost ended. We had a beautiful day, and we enjoyed it. We shared our hobby and interests with out visitors, and in turn stretched their horizons and interests. We enjoyed working together. We enjoyed operating on the radios and talking with folks near and far. And we got to participate in the VHF Contest too, especially with some nice propagation openings…

But the following year, we received a surprise in the mail:

June 2013 VHF 2

We had been awarded First Place within the Limited Multi-Operator category, for the Alabama Section, for the June 2013 VHF Contest!

Probably not many other folks in Alabama operated in this category. But nonetheless, that was sweet!

Your N4A QSLs are on the way…

N4MSN and N4CNY replying to QSL cards for our N4A event.

N4MSN and N4CNY replying to QSL cards for our N4A Apollo 11 45th Anniversary Special Event.

We received over 200 QSL cards for our Apollo 11 45th anniversary special event station N4A, that we operated in July. This afternoon we met after work to respond to them, with our special event cards.

During the past week Matt KA0S and Don N4MSN set up a database for our contacts who mailed us, and Stephen KK4IBB printed individualized signal reports for them. Rob KB5EZ also set up a complete checklist from our log. Today we systematically responded to almost all of the cards we received. We read to each other messages that were included. Many interesting individualized cards were sent to us, including some nice stamps.

Just a few cards are not matching our log record, and we suspect some may be intended for the W4A Apollo anniversary station that was set up by the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club at the US Space & Rocket Center. Whatever the case, we’ll investigate each outlier.

We sent our mail out this evening.

KB5EZ placing QSL cards in envelopes for sending.

KB5EZ placing N4A QSL cards in envelopes for our contacts.

Our QSL card team members this evening were John N4CNY, Don N4MSN, Rob KB5EZ, Gary WA2JQZ, Tina WA8U, and Stephen KK4IBB.

We anticipate we may continue to receive more QSL cards for the Apollo event, especially from overseas.  We will respond to those, once they come.  This evening’s work gave us a chance to look together at the whole group of cards, and talk about them.

Our N4A special event QSL card.

Our N4A special event QSL card.